Some retail audit apps only run on specific mobile devices.  They often run on iPhone™, iPad™ and Android™ but lack support for other mobile platforms such as Windows Phone™.  Some do not even support store PCs and district managers’ laptops running Microsoft Windows™ or Apple OS X™.  Why restrict options?  Isn’t universal access and broad participation important to the success of an in-store program?

The success of an in-store program, such as a merchandising campaign or health and safety audit, requires store-level participation. Audits are ineffective if the results are not shared with store management and staff and do not involve the stores, with the equipment on hand.  Users and stores expect, and need to, connect with the devices they have, be it a smartphone, a tablet or a PC. In this age of great inter-connectivity and open standards, why limit options and impose arbitrary technical constraints? Doing so only limits the reach and effectiveness of store programs and increases costs.

Supporting mobile devices and supporting store computers and laptops are not, and cannot be, mutually exclusive.  Modern software may be “mobile-first” but it shouldn’t be “mobile-only”.

One thought on “Mobile-First does not mean Mobile-Only

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